Sunday, 1 January 2012

delhi places to visit

Garden of Five Senses



The Garden of Five Senses is not just a park, it is a space with a variety of activities, inviting public interaction and exploration. The project, developed by Delhi Tourism Transportation Development Corporation, was conceptualized to answer to the city's need for leisure space for the public, for people to socialize and unwind. Such spaces add atmosphere and life to a city and cater to all sections of the society.

The twenty-acre site, located at Said-Ul-Azaib village, close to the Mehrauli heritage area in New Delhi, is spectacular. The Garden was inaugurated in February 2003. Majestic rocks stand silhouetted against the sky, others lie strewn upon the ground in a casual yet alluring display of nature's sculptural genius. It was the ideal ground on which to realize the concept of a public leisure space that would awaken a sensory response and thereby a sensitivity to the environment.

Soaring stainless-steel birds mounted on slate-clad pillars welcome you into the park. An expansive plaza, set on the natural slope of the site, invites you up the spiral walkway. Across, a troop of elephants, cut in stone, regaling in a water bath, tempts exploration.
The garden itself is divided into distinct areas. On one side of the spiral walkway is the Khas Bagh, a formal garden patterned on the lines of the Mughal Garden. Slow-moving water cascades in channels along its length, while flowering and fragrant shrubs and trees line its paths. The Central axis leads to a series of fountains, some of which are lit up by fibreoptic lighting systems. Encapsulating the expression here is the sculpture of 'A Fountain Tree".

Secluded, away from the heart of the garden, on the other side of the walkway is the food and shopping court. A series of terraces provided with seating arrangements face the food court.

The heady Trail of Fragrance leads away to a rocky ridge to the north, where elevated amongst the rocks, a sculpture in stainless-steel, inspired by a pin-wheel, dances in joyous abandon.

Wander down the meandering paths to Neel Bagh, a pool of water lilies encircled by pergols covered with climbing plants of different colours and textures.

Overhead, hundreds of ceraminc chime, whispering secrets to the breeze, teasing you with their gentle laughter.

There are Colour Gardens - beautiful compositions of flowering shrubs and ground covers that have you looking at familiar plants with new eyes. The Courts of Specimen Plants display not so frequently seen species - of bamboo, for instance, or cactii, or herbs.

Nestled amongst the natural slope of the site is the amphitheatre with blocks of sandstone to serve as seating. At the rear of the garden is an open exhibition area for displaying art and for holding art workshops.

Almost two hundred varieties of plants are introduced. In addition, there are large areas where the existing vegetation, consisting mainly of trees such as the local Kikar and the thorny Ber bush, has been left untouched.

The Garden has been designed to the imagery suggested by the name Garden of Five Senses. Colour, fragrances, texture and form all come together in an evocative bouquet that awakens the mind to the beauty of life and invokes a grateful prayer for the gift of sight, sound, touch, smell and taste.

Nature Walk

The Garden is designed to stimulate one's sensory responses to the environment. An amalgamation of color and fragrance, texture and form evokes the awareness of touch, smell, sight, sound and taste. Most of the works of art are dynamic, making it more interactive to the visitors. About 25 different sculptures and murals have been set up in the Garden making it one of the largest collection of public art in the country. This Garden is located near the first city of Delhi i.e. Qila Rai Pithora and while following the approach road to the Garden from T point of MB Road one can see the massive walls of this fort. The Garden of Five senses depict the architecture of the first city including the stones used in the constructions of boundary walls and dome shaped office complex. The walk begins with a description of trees which are planted in the outer area of the garden i.e. from the steps which you take, for moving in the garden complex. The details of the trees which fall in this area have been described below with their common name, botanical name and description for the benefit of the common man who can take a walk

Dilli Haat

The craftsmen who are registered with D.C.Handicrafts are the ones who are eligible to find a place here. The 62 stalls selling handicrafts are allotted on a rotational basis to craftsmen who come from all corners of the vast & varied land of India at a payment of mere INR 100 per day for a maximum period of 15 Days. This ensures that visitors get to buy authentic wares at prices that have not been inflated by high maintenance costs.

You can also savour the inimitable flavors of the delightful local foods from the various regions of India be it the momos from Sikkim or theBamboos hot chicken from NagalandKahwa & Kebabs from Jammu,Pooranpoli from Maharastra or the Gujrati Dhokla. As many as 25 food stalls offer you variety of foods served in an Eco friendly manner.

The DILLI HAAT provides the ambience of a traditional Rural Haat or village market, but one suited for more contemporary needs. Here one sees a synthesis of crafts, food and cultural activity.

This Food and Craft Bazar is a treasure house of Indian culture, handicrafts and ethnic cuisine, A unique bazaar, in the heart of the city, it displays the richness of Indian culture on a permanent basis.

Step inside the complex for an altogether delightful experience by either buying inimitable ethnic wares, savouring the delicacies of different states or by simply relaxing in the evening with the entire family.

DILLI HAAT transports you to the magical world of Indian art and heritage presented through a fascinating panorama of craft, cuisine and cultural activities.

While the village haat is a mobile, flexible arrangement, here it is crafts persons who are mobile. The DILLI HAAT boasts of nearly 200 craft stalls selling native, utilitarian and ethnic products from all over the country.

An ambitious project, set up jointly by Delhi tourism and NDMC, D.C. (Handicrafts) & D.C. (handlooms), Ministry of Textiles, Govt. of India & Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India. It aims at providing encouragement to the needy artists from all over the country in order to sustain and preserve the rich heritage of India.

While allowing free interaction between buyers and sellers, the organizers favour a check on prices to keep them moderate.

Different and appealing, DILLI HAAT is located in one of the most important commercial centers of South Delhi, opposite INA market. The 6 acres of land on which this sprawling complex is situated was salvaged as part of a reclamation project and transformed into a magnificent dream plaza. Extensive foundation work, small thatched roof cottages and kiosks with a village atmosphere have made the place into an attractive multiple center.

The word Haat refers to a weekly market in rural, semi-urban and sometimes even urban India.

DILLI HAAT is not just a market place; it has been visualized as a showpiece of traditional Indian culture- a forum where rural life and folk art are brought closer to an urban clientele.

It is here that the crafts persons find an opportunity to demonstrate their artistic skills to thousands of visitors everyday.

Since its inauguration in the month of March 1994, Dilli Haat has been home to nearly 50,000 handicraft and handloom artisans. The sales generated, so far, are estimated at Rupees three hundred crores.

The complex is not only artistic, but also recreational in nature where the entire family can have a good time.
It is a place where one can unwind in the evening and relish a wide variety of cuisine without paying the exhorbitant rates.

Besides an International Food Plaza there are 25 stalls dishing out sumptuous delicacies from different States and Union Territories; and Exhibition Hall; a Souvenir shop selling an assortment of small gift items; an open stage for cultural programmes and a playing area exclusively earmarked for children.

Architecture

The architectural features of the complex have been especially designed in the traditional north Indian style, with brickwork jail (lattice) and stone roofs.

A hall in the complex specifically caters to exhibitions of the handlooms and handicrafts. A souvenir shop, also displays attractive ethnic products.

The small thatched roof cottages and kiosks, without any concrete structures provide a village atmosphere.

The shops are set up on platforms, which act as a link in the Bazar design. The courtyards between the shops are paved in stone and interspaced with grass to retain a visual softness.

The landscaping of the area incorporates colourful flowering shrubs and trees, thus the entire complex is in harmony with the environment









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